Non-EU Citizens' Unemployment Rate Higher than for EU28 Nationals
Wednesday, July 30, 2014

In 2013 in the EU28, the unemployment rate for non-EU citizens1 (21.3%) aged 20 to 642 was more than twice the level for citizens of the reporting country (10.0%), referred to as “nationals1”. However, the share of people unemployed for 12 months or more was at almost the same level for non-EU citizens (48.6%) and for nationals (49.4%).

As regards employment, the rate for non-EU citizens aged 20 to 64 in the EU28 stood at 56.1%, while it was 68.9% for nationals. The share of employees aged 20 to 64 with a temporary contract was higher for non-EU citizens (20.2%) than for nationals (12.4%). The pattern was the same for the proportion of part time employment, which was more widespread amongst non-EU citizens (27.5%) than amongst nationals (18.4%).

 

This information comes from a publication3 issued by Eurostat, the statistical office of the European Union, with data, broken down by citizenship and country of birth, on a large range of indicators related to the labour market outcomes of migrant population, of which only a small selection is shown in this News Release. Labour market migrant integration indicators4 are the first in a planned series of publications on migrant integration, including social inclusion and education, to be released in Autumn this year.

 

Labour market migrant integration indicators by citizenship in the EU28, ages 20-64, 2013

 

Citizens of the reporting country (nationals)

Foreign citizens

Of which:

 

     

Citizens of another EU Member State

Non-EU citizens

 

EMPLOYMENT

 

Employment rate

68.9

61.9

70.9

56.1

Share of employees with a temporary contract (%)

12.4

18.6

16.4

20.2

Part-time employment (%)

18.4

26.0

24.0

27.5

 

UNEMPLOYMENT

 

Unemployment rate (%)

10.0

17.5

12.2

21.3

Share of long-term unemployment (%)

49.4

46.1

40.0

48.6

Highest employment rate for citizens of another EU Member State

The situation of citizens of another EU Member State was very different. In 2013 in the EU28, the employment rate for citizens of another EU Member State1 (70.9%) aged 20 to 64 was slightly higher than that for citizens of the reporting country (68.9%). Regarding employment conditions, the share of employees aged 20 to 64 with a temporary contract in the EU28 was higher for citizens of another EU Member State (16.4%) than for nationals (12.4%), as was the proportion of part-time employment (24.0% citizens of another EU Member State, compared with 18.4% for nationals).

For unemployment, the rate for citizens of another EU Member State aged 20 to 64 in the EU28 stood at 12.2% in 2013, while it was 10.0% for nationals. The share of long-term unemployment was however notably lower for citizens of another EU Member State (40.0%) than for nationals (49.4%).

Employment rates differ the most between non-EU citizens and nationals in Sweden, Belgium, the Netherlands, France, Finland and Germany

In 2013 in the EU28, the employment rate was 56.1% for non-EU citizens, compared with 68.9% for citizens of the reporting country. In nearly all EU Member states, the employment rate of nationals was higher than for non-EU citizens, except in Cyprus (66.8% for nationals compared with 74.3% for non-EU citizens), the Czech Republic (72.4% compared with 79.5%), Lithuania (69.8% compared with 70.8%) and Italy (59.5% compared with 60.1%). The pattern was more mixed when comparing the employment rate for nationals with that for citizens of another EU Member State.

In 2013 across Member States, the largest differences between the employment rates for non-EU citizens and for nationals were recorded in Sweden (50.2% for non-EU citizens compared with 81.3% for nationals, or -31.1 percentage points), followed by Belgium (-28.8 pp), the Netherlands (-26.8 pp), France (-22.0 pp), Finland (-20.5 pp) and Germany (-20.2 pp).

Differences between employment rates of non-EU citizens and of nationals, 2013
 (in percentage points)

Employment rates of population aged 20-64 years, by broad group of citizenship, 2013

 

Citizens of the reporting country (nationals)

Foreign citizens

Of which:

 

     

Citizens of another EU Member State

Non-EU citizens

EU28

68.9

61.9

70.9

56.1

Belgium

68.7

55.3

63.6

39.9

Bulgaria

63.6

(54.4)

:

:

Czech Republic

72.4

78.5

77.4

79.5

Denmark

76.7

64.6

74.1

58.0

Germany

78.7

65.0

75.2

58.5

Estonia

74.6

67.0

(67.1)

67.0

Ireland

65.8

64.2

68.6

54.4

Greece

53.4

50.3

52.4

49.7

Spain

59.5

52.8

58.2

50.0

France*

70.6

55.9

70.1

48.6

Croatia

53.9

(42.5)

:

(39.7)

Italy

59.5

61.9

65.8

60.1

Cyprus

66.8

68.7

64.8

74.3

Latvia

71.3

60.5

76.6

60.2

Lithuania

69.8

(73.7)

:

(70.8)

Luxembourg

68.7

73.6

74.8

61.7

Hungary

63.2

64.9

65.6

63.0

Malta

65.0

59.9

53.4

63.8

Netherlands

77.3

61.6

74.6

50.5

Austria

76.8

67.2

75.5

60.7

Poland

64.9

67.0

(79.0)

62.0

Portugal

65.8

59.0

60.4

58.6

Romania

63.9

:

:

:

Slovenia

67.4

59.6

52.4

60.4

Slovakia

65.0

78.0

78.3

:

Finland

73.8

60.9

71.4

53.3

Sweden

81.3

61.0

75.5

50.2

United Kingdom

75.4

70.4

79.2

61.9

*       excluding overseas departments

:       Data missing or not published due to small sample size.

The reliability of data shown in brackets may be affected by small sample sizes.

1.        Nationals means citizens of the reporting country. Citizens of another EU Member State refers to citizens of another EU27 Member State (excluding Croatian citizens). Citizens of a country outside the EU refers to non-EU27 citizens.

2.        In this news release, all indicators refer to the population aged 20 to 64. This age group is not the same as used in Eurostat labour market statistics.

3.        Eurostat, Statistics explained article "Migrant integration- Employment indicators 2013". Available on the Eurostat website: http://epp.eurostat.ec.europa.eu/statistics_explained/index.php/Migrant_integration_statistics_-_employment. Data presented in this News Release could differ from the data published in the Statistics explained article, due to updates made after the data extractions used for the publication. The data source is the Labour Force Survey (LFS). The LFS is a large sample survey among private households. It should be noted that LFS data refer to the resident population and therefore LFS results relate to the country of residence of persons in employment, rather than to the country of work. This difference may be significant in countries with large cross-border flows.

4.        The employment rate represents employed persons as a percentage of the same age population.

Employees with a temporary contract are employees whose main job will terminate either after a period fixed in advance, or after a period not known in advance, but nevertheless defined by objective criteria, such as the completion of an assignment or the period of absence of an employee temporarily replaced.

Part-time employees: The distinction between full-time and part-time work is made on the basis of a spontaneous answer given by the respondent.

The unemployment rate is the number of people unemployed as a percentage of the labour force. The labour force is the total number of people employed plus unemployed.

Long-term unemployment consists of unemployed persons who have been looking for a job for one year or more.

Issued by: Eurostat Press Office

Vincent BOURGEAIS

Tel: +352-4301-33 444

eurostat-pressoffice@ec.europa.eu

For further information on data:

Piotr JUCHNO

Tel: +352-4301-36 240

piotr.juchno@ec.europa.eu

 

Eurostat news releases on the internet: http://ec.europa.eu/eurostat

Follow Eurostat on Twitter: http://twitter.com/EU_Eurostat

 


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